How To Be An Adult Part 2: Simple Budgeting Guidelines

Simple budgeting guidelines

How to be an adult part 2: Simple Budgeting Guidelines

Now that you understand how your pay cheques work let’s talk about budgeting that money.

What is a budget?

So what exactly is a budget? Well according to the smart people over at Merriam Webster(the dictionary people) Budget as a noun is defined as:

a :  a statement of the financial position of an administration for a definite period of time based on estimates of expenditures during the period and proposals for financing them
b
 :  a plan for the coordination of resources and expenditures
c
 :  the amount of money that is available for, required for, or assigned to a particular purpose

And as a Verb:
1a :  to put or allow for in a budget
b :  to require to adhere to a budget

2a :  to allocate funds for in a budget <budget a new hospital>
b :  to plan or provide for the use of in detail <budgeting manpower>

So basically, for our purposes of personal finance a budget is the plan you give yourself on how you’re going to allocate your money. It doesn’t have to be spending, if you’re budgeting your pay cheque it should certainly have savings in it. Also you may want to include something towards an emergency fund.

How does one go about making a budget?

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8 money tips from Johnny Depp’s finances

Johnny Depp




8 money tips from Johnny Depp’s finances

Well in case you have more of a life than me or just don’t care for celebrity gossip, Johnny Depp is (allegedly) going broke. Last year he finalized a divorce settlement for 7 million dollars, which is pennies for an actor that made $55 million for ONE Pirates of the Caribbean movie right? Well it seems that might not be the case! He also recently filed a $25 million lawsuit against his business managers. He claims his funds were mismanaged. We’d really have no way of knowing how mismanaged they were because we don’t have his spending history. (….or do we?)

Depp’s management group of course doesn’t think they mismanaged his funds. They’re so against this idea that they’ve now launched a counter-suit. In the details of this counter-suit they’ve revealed some details of his spending. They’ve also revealed that his monthly expenditures are ASTRONOMICAL. 

After hearing about his monthly expenditures, I asked a few people how much they think Johnny Depp spends each month.  A few guesses were in the tens of thousands of dollars, the majority were in the $100,000 to $300,000 range both of these ranges aren’t enough for ol’ Johnny(that’s what his friends call him…). The highest guess was a million dollars, A MILLION DOLLARS EACH MONTH?!?!  Well that’s not even close!  Read more

Year end update – Q4 2016

Q4 2016 update

Another year is over and so here’s another update, this time for Q4 2016. As I mentioned in my last quarterly update I was jamming all of my trips into the last half of this year, so we’ll say I was on vacation…even though I probably wasn’t.

I’ll do a quick brag about my trips to start this off and get it out of the way.   Read more

3 simple financial resolutions you need to start

3 simple financial resolutions

Happy New year everyone!  

I hope 2016 was better to you than the media portrayed it to be. For the last few months of the year you’d swear nothing good happened. I think those people just didn’t have time to look at their retirement savings. The year was pretty solid overall for the markets, the Dow Jones was up 14.4% as of closing just before Christmas.

3 simple financial resolutions you need to start

Very solid year for the Dow Jones

For Canadians, the TSX composite index was up 17.8% over the same time period! So, if your investments are close or matching these indexes you’re looking at a possible 14-18% return for one year.  To put that into perspective you’ll double your portfolio in 5 years without any additional contributions! Read more

How to make money in real estate

make money in real estate





How to make money in real estate? That’s a very popular question and has tons of answers! You can literally make money with lots of different options, and each option has multiple ways to execute them. On top of that, you can apply each of those options to different areas of real estate like residential, commercial, industrial, etc. I could go on for a while with these but I won’t. Soooo see ya next week!?

NAAA! I’m just kidding…had ya for a minute though didn’t I? You thought I was going to take my dozens of blog dollars and disappear for ever didn’t you?  Actually, I’m just going to touch on a few popular options and a few lesser known options on a higher level. In a future post I’ll break each of them down in greater detail, but for now we’re just going to dip our toes in the water on how to make money in real estate.  Read more

Why aren’t Canadians saving money with comparison sites?

why-arent-canadians-saving-money-with-comparison-sites





Comparison sites have been around a long time; you’ve almost certainly used some yourself. Have you ever searched for a trip on Expedia or Kayak? I do it all the time, you can usually save a few hundred dollars on trips you’re planning.  They’re also great research tools to help plan and budget your trips.

Have you ever bought anything on Amazon or eBay? Me too! You’d be foolish to buy something online and not consult these sites for price comparisons. You’d also be foolish to not check a site like Ebates to get an even further discount on your trips or products or money back.

While the above-mentioned sites work great for 90% of our purchasing. They unfortunately don’t help us with big ticket items like insurance and mortgages. Insurance typically is worth thousands of dollars and mortgages are often in the hundreds of thousands. You can save more on these than you would on almost any other purchase, besides the houses and cars themselves. Apparently, Canadians just don’t do this. According to a recent study by LowestRates.ca only 8% of respondents used a comparison site to source their most recent mortgage! WHAT?!?

Why would no one use these financial comparison sites?

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Money tips for any age

4 of the best money tips for any age




Money tips for any age

Here are four money tips that you will either have success with, or you will regret not following. The choice is yours!

Never finance depreciating assets

If you’re borrowing money and the asset depreciates in value you’re paying much more than you think.  Debt is not a bad thing if used correctly. If you use it to purchase properties that increase in value it can be worth it. You can borrow at 3% on a mortgage and you gain 4% each year on average on that house value, your net worth will still be increasing. If you buy stocks on a margin and they gain more than the cost to service your debt, you’re still ahead.

It’s when you buy everyday products on a credit card and don’t pay it off before you incur interest when you fall behind. With a depreciating asset you’re losing money over time on owning the asset and you’re also paying interest to own it. Look at owning a new car for an example. Buying a new car at 0.9% interest is a pretty good deal as far as finance rates go, but you’ll still pay more to lose money. Buying one at 0% is even better, the car will depreciate but you won’t be on the hook for any interest.  Read more

How did I change my financial mindset?

How did I change my financial mindset?

My financial mindset has changed over the years. Growing up and always having some kind of income since I was about 10 years old definitely gave me a good work ethic. It also gave me a lot of spending money because as a kid I had no financial obligations.  Because of this abundance of spending money, my financial mindset started off terrible. I had no problem buying myself comic books every week or snacks at the corner store. This all lead to probably an excessive spending habit in my later teenage years when I discovered paintball.  After playing twice when I was 12 or 13 I went out and spent $400 dollars on an entry level gun and mask.  After a few more times, I upgraded my mask to a thermal lense and started to spend more and more on gear.  This grew over my teenage years to having 5-6 paintball guns at any given time and countless accessories.  Read more

Passive income: It’s the best income

Passive income

Passive Income is the best income

Why is passive income the best income? Well first let’s break down what passive income is.  Passive income is earnings derived from equity investments such as rental properties, dividends, enterprises, or limited partnerships that you are not directly involved with.

Basically you give someone money and they give you a small amount of money back for an indefinite amount of time. The time could be forever provided the equity in your investment doesn’t go to $0. Passive income can be derived from numerous sources, the majority of which are available to everyone with minimal efforts.

What are some common sources of passive income?

Passive income can come in many varieties. I’ll touch on a few of the most common ones Read more

5 Tips For Beginner Investors

beginner investors

5 Tips For Beginner Investors

Investing your money for the first time is a daunting task. Sure, it can sound pretty exciting; the idea of putting money away and watching it multiply over time would be appealing to anybody, and if you do everything right, that’s just what will happen. But to actually confront the strategies, challenges, and mental hurdles involved with setting up an investment portfolio is different than just imagining things going well. It takes a lot of diligent work, and to some extent there’s a leap of faith required.

But never fear. Millions before you have invested, and done so successfully. As a result there’s plenty of good advice out there for when you’re just getting started. What follows is by no means a comprehensive list, but these are five general tips that can help to get you in the proper mindset to approach your first investments.  Read more

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